Spoiler Alert: Nothing awful happened. I wasn’t hacked. I didn’t have any particular bad experience or social media faux pas. But I did go ahead and either delete or deactivate most of my social media accounts in the last 24 hours. Here’s the rundown:

  • Facebook: Deactivated, not officially Deleted (yet)
  • Facebook Business Pages: Also Deactivated.
  • Instagram: Deleted
  • LinkedIn: Keeping
  • MySpace: Keeping (just kidding)
  • Twitter: Deleted

So why did I do it? I spent a good part of yesterday writing a 1,400 word post about it, but I’ll break that up into bite-sized chunks for you later. The short version is: I just didn’t want to have to be tethered to them anymore.

Instagram

I was never big on using Instagram. I tried it a couple times but like the way my wife loves her chai tea and I don’t, I just couldn’t get into Instagram. So that one was a no-brainer.

Twitter

Twitter. I love Twitter like some people love a three o’clock raid on the office candy machine for M&Ms. I go to Twitter to read what other Christians are talking about, jokes, memes, and breaking news. But there’s also a lot of mundane stuff that I don’t really need to be wasting my precious few brain cells with. Twitter’s popularity is on the decline anyway, and frankly I’m really tired of their blatant censorship of conservatives, both Christian and nonChristian.

Facebook

Facebook. Being on Facebook is like being in an unhealthy relationship. You know you really should just move on. You know you could do better for yourself. But you share the same group of friends, and when things are good, it’s good. The problem is: 90% of the time it’s a dysfunctional mess that wants to suck the life out of you.

I also had Facebook business pages for my real estate business and also a page for this blog. The cardinal rule in real estate these days is to be active on social media. You must be on social media, they say. The more the better. You must frequently post content and interact with clients and friends to stay “top of mind” and generate referrals from them.

Frankly, I got tired of being beholden to that conventional wisdom. I don’t want to have to keep feeding the churn machine. The world will go on with one less real estate agent posting pictures of puppies, kittens, and kitchens.

Facebook’s Deactivate Vs. Delete: The Messy Breakup

So why didn’t I outright delete my Facebook account, instead of only deactivating it where I can re-engage anytime by logging in again? Good question. I don’t know. I guess in case I end up regretting my decision and to spare me the hassle of recreating everything. My plan is to leave it deactivated for a month (at least) and see how it goes.

LinkedIn

LinkedIn. I’ve never actually liked LinkedIn, but then again I’ve never cared for the corporate culture that taught me to involuntarily blurt out buzzwords like “synergy”, “touch-base”, and “key learnings” on conference calls. Still, it’s good for showing yourself as professional and doesn’t actually require a lot of babysitting.

#TheNutshellVersion

Ultimately, I found social media was in my life more than I really wanted it to be. I would wake up in the morning, go out to my phone in the kitchen (where it belongs, not the bedroom), and my time in prayer & Bible reading would be usurped by scrolling Facebook. It was completely my fault for letting that happen, but it goes to show the tempting power of this world’s distractions on us as believers, which we need to fight against.

Have you considered getting off social media? How’d it go? Leave a comment. If you wish to send me a private message, fill out the comment form and note that you would like me to delete the comment, not post it.

Yours,

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